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and invites them to watch a movie with spielberg. i'm referring to "lincoln." basically the republican party keeps talking on two sides of their face and not being hon west the american people they just don't like this president. but that's one of the reasons why the president recognizes his vacuum when it comes to that leadership. that's why he keeps sending vice president biden down to the congress to the negotiate on his behalf because they just don't like him. >> let's look at the record, maria teresa. speaker boehner has declined invitations to state dinners for each of the following countries, south korea, germany, china, mexico, india, and, of course, great britain. as for republican senate leader mitch mcconnell he turned down invasions for the state dinners of india and china. he even declined to come to the white house then the president was celebrating his home state's college basketball championships. but it's the president's fault that republicans aren't comfortable with him. explain that to me. >> something that may not be well-known is when boehner actually did go to one of th
touches on it. >> we were talking about a lot of references to the 701 words by abraham lincoln. >> first of all, and there are not a heck of a lot of second inaugural addresses out there. lincoln's definitely stand out. possibly george w. bush. so much has happened in his first term. it was such a different picture international arena than it was at the beginning of his first term. >> the second inaugural address was longer than the first. >> we have quite a challenge with president clinton. the second address was rather long. he had a way with the audience. i think he made up for it with his delivery. he was very captivating with people. i think inaugural addresses and typically tended to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity. it is that a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. it is much more rhetorical and poetic. >> the president will deliver his state of union address. >> that will be his policy agenda. it will also be a speech that makes a lot more news than the inaugural address. the inaugural address kind of comes and goes. the
laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to democracynow.org. this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
and awarded a presidential medal of arts and lincoln medal. she joins me with douglas brinkley. welcome to you, doctor angelou. how are you? >> i'm splendid, thank you. and you? >> i'm extremely honored to be talking to you, actually. i mean that very sincerely. i want to remind you of an e-mail on behalf of the president talking about a conversations you had with dr. martin luther king and of course tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day. i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. but in those conversations with martin luther king, he felt there may be an african-american president, the first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> it's -- that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country. that we are growing up. >> and how do you think the president -- >> we are moving beyond ignorance. >> right. how do you think. >> sorry? >> how do you think he's done, president obama, in the first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he cou
memorable moments. she was awarded the lincoln medal in 2008. she joins me along with douglas brinkley. how are you? >> i'm good and you. >> i want to remind you of an e-mail that you sent out. you talked about conversations you had with dr. martin luther king. tomorrow is mlk day. it couldn't be a more appropriate day i'm sure you would feel for barack obama's second inauguration. in those conversations he felt there may be an african-american president, first black president in the next 40 years. you didn't think it would happen in your lifetime. >> that's true. i'm so excited. i'm so happy about my country that we are growing up. >> how do you think the president -- >> we're growing beyond our ignorance. >> how do you think he's done in his first term and what would you like him to do more of in his second term? >> well, i think he's done the best he could. i think that there were a number of people who as soon as he was elected put their feet down, their heels into the earth and said no matter what he does, no matter how good he is, i will not support him. i will resist his attempts to
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
inaugural addresses and a lot of references to lincoln's second saturday much more famous than his first address but that is the exception. guest: i suppose it is. there aren't a lot of inaugural addresses out there. but lincoln's definitely stands out. i'm trying to think offhand whose president's second inaugural address resinated more than the first. possibly my president, george bush. because it was such a different picture at the second term than at the beginning of his first. host: both of you bush, 43, president blin's second inaugural address was longer than the first. guest: yes, we had quite a challenge with president clinton. as most people know, he tends to like to speak long. the second address was rather long but, you know, he had a way with the audience and i think he made up for it with the delivery and he was captivating with people. although, i think a normal address typically tend to be shorter than other major presidential addresses. it is a moment of national unity, it is not a moment to lay out a detailed policy agenda. so, you know, it is more rhetorical and poetic
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
: and abraham lincoln's, delivered to a nation divided by civil war. >> with malice toward none, with charity for all. >> reporter: a third theme, renewing our commitment to the values of our founding fathers. perhaps it's surprising the president found inspiration in the words of this former a adversa adversary. >> there can be no human rights without human liberty. >> reporter: aides tell us that, although the president disagrees with mr. bush's policy, he's moved by the speech's democratic principles. >> freedom by its nature must be chosen and defended by citizens. >> reporter: a message, aides say, the president will echo today, as he did at the white house last week. >> that most fundamental set of rights, to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> reporter: of all his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white ho
that i admire more than anybody in history are dr. king and mr. lincoln. so being sworn in with the bibles of these two men that i admire so deeply, the 50th anniversary of the march on washington is, i think, fitting because their actions, the movements they represent, are the only reason that it's possible for me to be inaugurated. as the president said, the actions of lincoln and king made this moment possible. and, today, we heard a new side of dr. king. new york public radio added a previously unreleased interview from 1961 with dr. king talking about his work and his fears. here he is talking about how his mother talked to him about racism at an early age. >> it seems to me that the only thing the mother can do is to try from the beginning to instill in the child some bodiness. this is what my mother tried to do. she made it very clear that inspite of these conditions, you must not feel that you are not. and this was her way of saying you should not have an inferiority complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
the quite remarkable book, april 1865 about lincoln's last days and inauguration is with us here. real quickly, jay, before the president comes out and the vice president, second inaugurations, what is special about them? >> it is special because it marks the continuing of a second term. of course we think of abraham lincoln's masterpiece second inaugural which inspired all americans of his day. i think really it's a day of humility. george washington put it best. he said after taking the oath of office my hand trembles but my heart does not. i think that pretty much sums it up. >> his was the shortest inaugural address, first ever, 135 words. lincoln's was only 700 words in 1865. a lot of people think it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. >> it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. the nation was in the throes of a civil war. lincoln was exhausted. before he gave the speech he spent time in the capitol signing bills. there was a lot to work to be done. >> with malice toward none and charity for all. obviously the civil war was about to end and he was ver
spoke them. abraham lincoln with malice toward none, charity for all, let us strive to finish the work we are in to bind up the nation's wounds. john f. kennedy asked not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. franklin roosevelt, let me assert my firm believe that the only thing we have to fear is fear it itself. >> what makes a speech a part of history and what does this president need to say tomorrow as he begins his second term joining us are michael gerson speechwriter for president bush and james fallis, speechwriter to president carter. you say you don't write to be etched in granite, but i know that writers know when words ring. when you put words on paper, you think, i can see this, you know, as being what will be taken from this speech. so how do you craft those? >> it's true. the chair richter version is the state of the union address. i think with the inaugural address it's harder because something that registers as a showy line may come off as too showy. i think my sense of inaugural addresses the more they are poem like, the more they are s
one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic not
lincoln. when harry truman was worrying about firing mcarthur, he's reading about mcclellan, what did lincoln do about mcclellan. you think about your own life, learn from your own experiences. he will have learned from this fist term an enormous set of things to take with him to the second term, strengthed and weaknesses. but you can learn from all these guys before you, like learning from your grandparents and great grandparents. great when a president cares about history. >> give me a measure, michael, of how much this president is attuned to history, how much it plays a part of his lady life. i know i've read he tries to find up to three hours a day and night between 9:00 and midnight to read. >> he is above all a writer, so not surprising given what this is his day job is. but, you know, i think the most revealing thing was just after the election he gave that press conference and was asked about second terms. you remember? he said i am very familiar with the literature on second-term overreach. we both loved lyndon johnson. i don't think he ever read two words on second-term ove
. and more recently. no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had they all attended, they would have joined not only nancy prksz pelosi and harry reid but tommy lee jones. as tip o'neil said, love the sinner, hate the sin. we need to get back to a time when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neil. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here's hoping that it sill it spills over to the next four years. both sides become more social, more civil and, hence, more productive. thanks for being with us. politics nation with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, michael. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, i'll second that. we're just three days away from history. president obama will be sworn in for the second time on the steps of the capital. and he looks pretty happy about it. take a look at his official second term portrait released today. that's a man who won a decisive election. who's proud of his accomplishment. yes, he's older than the man who appeared in that 2009 picture. but with his new grey
the inauguration. on monday he will place his hands on two bibles. one from abraham lincoln and the other from dr. martin luther king jr. andrew seattle who is with the freedom from religion foundation. mr. stittle, abraham lincoln and dr. king too two amazing american icons you want to take their bibles and remove them from the ceremony. >> i much prefer dr. king's writing on the letter from the birmingham jail where he talks about the white church standing on the sideline mouthing trivialalities and pyes irrelevancy while he does the work of the civil rights movement. >> bill: you must know that dr. king invoked god in almost every speech that he made. >> article 2 section one of the constitution which lays out the oath does not say anything about the word so help me god. it says i will preserve to the best of my ability, preserve, defend and protect the states period. it's kind of ironic that the president is going to amend that in the middle of it. >> bill: do you know why george washington wanted the words god so help me god in? do you know why? >> george washington did not say so help me go
said he really drew inspiration from dr. king and abraham lincoln for today's speech, ed. >> that's right, shep. you heard the president citing both of them, talking a lot about civil rights and really casting himself as someone who wants to carry on their civil rights legacies. i think the broadered message of that what it means in the current political environment is he made very clear that he just didn't win the last election. he believes he has a mandate. he believes he is going to be very aggressive in the days ahead. he was talking about taking action on climate change, immigration reform and at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits. he also gave a very rigorous defense of entitlement spending, take a listen. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. [ applause ] they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. [ applause ] >> now, interesting as well that the white house put out a tweet about a
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, saveunbornlives.org and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
goodwin later on. what is the chance he doesn't quote lincoln's second inaugural? >> i would be shocked if lincoln is not quoted. i would be shocked if specific issues aren't mentioned. that doesn't mean he isn't going to talk about newtown. but as far as talking about guns and gun control, he's got a state of the union in three weeks. advisers continue to remind us of that. hey, this is not a laundry list of things he wants to get done. yes, he has a small window. i think savannah is right, i think we'll be able to judge by the fourth of july of this year, has he gotten one of his gun proposals passed through congress, is immigration done? all of those things, if he can get them done, probably need to get done by the summer. but today's speech knot for that. that's that state of the union which takes place in three weeks. >> all right. chuck todd in front of reviewing stand. we want to show you, especially those just joining us the kind of calendar of events, the schedule upcoming. right now, the president is hosting congressional leaders inside the white house for a kind of traditiona
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
, falling short of the dream. why the gop, the party of lincoln, is failing to honor the legacy of martin luther king jr. on his birthday. >>> but first, the miracle on the hudson four years ago today. now we have a miracle in the desert. you won't believe what arizona governor jan brewer has decided to do. ♪ [ male announcer ] there are only so many foods that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. and you see the womanoup you fell in love with. she's everything to you. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and ask if your heart is healthy enough for sexual act
-- was a terrible -- he's kind of like lincoln in a way -- are you for slavery or are you not? because he's trying to keep the border states in line. he was terrified that if he ceded the black delegation that the white democrats from kentucky and tennessee and the other border states would walk out, and that's what -- he was pretending that he didn't have anything to do with it, but he was consumed by no other issue, and putting that together is an amazing story -- or chapter, i think, in our american history about the sensitivity of this issue at this time. c-span: but when he came up to the white house, he didn't have a meeting scheduled with lyndon johnson and he was supposed to meet with hubert humphrey. >> guest: right. c-span: and there was a lot of maneuvering around. >> guest: i'm sorry. you're talking about -- this is at selma. this is at sali in february of 1965. dr. king can out of jail in sali and announced in depression, he came out of jail and his aides said you can't just come out of jail. you have to have a purpose for coming out of jail. and he said i'm tired. i'm depressed. i've
in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial. ok. the book starts out and it has a picture of me. now when i wrote this book, i envisioned that i would be reading to children just like you, and the reason i thought of that is because my grandmother and my aunt lived in the home with us and many times they would baby-sit for my mother and father and they would sit and read to us and engage us in conversation. so i thought that this book would be like a grand conversation. i'm going to read some things to you. and so often children and even adults don't think about dr. king as a normal boy who did the same things that you do. you like to play, right? and so did he. all right. now i'm going to read some of the things to you. i start out by saying, gather around and listen, just like you are gathered around me, as i share childhood memories of my brother, the reverend dr. martin luther king jr. i am his older sister and i have known him longer than anyone else around. i knew him long before the speeches he gave and the marches he led and the prizes he won. i even knew him before he dreamed the d
nominees glamorize guns: "django unchained," "zero dark thirty," "argo," "lincoln" and the worst one of all "les miserables." who among us didn't want to shoot russell crowe? [ laughter ] [cheers and applause] and movies aren't the only culprit. the real problem is the media our kids consume. isn't that right, media adults consume? >> why does congress always take aim, if you will, at guns? >> you've got to talk about society, violent video games >> these are murder simulators. they rehearse the action. >> the extraordinary realism to video games and movies now, et cetera, does cause vulnerable young men, particularly, to be more violent. >> stephen: true, and in a lot of these games they're not just using guns but crowbars, baseball bats, and even chainsaws. that puts frightening ideas in kids' heads. at this point, if i see a teenager coming at me with a chainsaw, i'm sorry, but i cross to the other side of the street. [ laughter ] of course, video game violence is not a new problem. who can forget, in the wake of sim city, how children everywhere took up urban planning? [ laughter ] it w
lincoln, and the other by martin luther king jr., known for his civil rights and anti-poverty activism. the inauguration comes on january 21, the federal holiday in honor of the civil-rights leader who delivered his i have a dream" speech 50 years ago the lincoln memorial. he has addressed the issue of martin luther king and poverty before in 2011 when he spoke at the dedication of the martin luther king monument at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools
birthday and mine. >> eric: robert, president obama sworn in today with two bibles. one was abraham lincoln's and the second belonged to reverend leon, b., john f.be kennedy, dr. martin luther king junior or jeremiah wright. that is for you. >> kimberly: i think all the answers are "c" today. >> eric: he was sworn in on two bibles. dana, this is for you. stop cheating. five flags for flown at the capitol today. two of betsy ross colonials and one was the current flag and the other two. do we have a picture of that, by the way? >> kimberly: other two? >> eric: five flags. in the middle is the u.s. flag. and then betsy ross colonials. what are the two straddling the other? state of illinois when admitted to the union? or "b," when the state of hawaii was admitted -- >> greg: never happened. >> eric: "c," washington, d.c., made the capital. or afl-cio. >> dana: one is illinois. >> eric: they are both the united states flag of illinois. who was sworn in, global warming that you like to talk about. who is sworn in with the warmest temperature at the inauguration? >> greg: ronald reagan. >> eric:
. and then another. and then another. he gave them a quick -- a completely inebriated inaugural address. lincoln was mortified. i unfortunately for johnson, it sets a public image of the andrew johnson. another burly disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge as vice- president. he used his address to tell the senate how they should operate. it set him off on a bad -- starting in 1937, that is when the congress started before the president. now president and vice presidents are sworn outside on the steps. the vice president lost his chance to give an inaugural address. there was one exception in that long tradition of the inauguration speech tell that the capital. that was in 1945 when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. franklin roosevelt, his third inauguration was done at the capitol, but his fourth one was in the middle of world war ii. he felt this was not the inopportune time to have an elaborate inauguration. he decided on his own to move the inauguration to the south front of the capital. the joint committee was not happy with that decision.
ceremony on martin luther king employing bibles by martin luther king and president lincoln. an address down the mall toward lincoln's memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech. to spell out the country his vision for the next four years. it is america's quadrennial celebration of the office of the presidency, the orderly transition of power, the luminaries, the singers, the salutes, the speech, the pomp, the circumstance, the second inauguration of president barack obama starts right now. >>> welcome to washington. it is chilly but frankly bearable outside as the country prepares to celebrate the peaceful maintenance of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have
'll pay tribute to the past. he'll be sworn in on two bibles. one used by abraham lincoln. and one, fittingly on this day, used by dr. martin luther king jr. the president will celebrate at two inaugural balls, versus the ten held four years ago. even if there's less fanfare, the day will not be without its pomp and circumstance. and star power. katy perry kicked things off at a concert earlier this weekend. ♪ at last >> reporter: and beyonce, whose rendition of edda james' "at last" was a highlight of the 2009 inauguration, will this time perform the national anthem, at the capitol ceremony. who can forget that moment in 2009. again, sasha pointed out, dad did not mess it up. he has one more shot at it. >> that's right, josh. >>> today, a day for poetry. the prose of governing comes next. and jonathan karl at the capitol for that. as the president prepares to deliver his speech, his team is gearing up for a lot of big debates ahead. >> reporter: you can see the presidential podium, still covered in plastic. it is from there that he will deliver one of the most important speeches
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)